Nothing Says Kindness Like DONUTS!

Kindness is delicious! Thanks to Miss Sugg’s first grade class at Fishers Elementary School for writing about their Donut Kindness Project and sharing with HSE21 Shorts.

IMG_8520We are Miss Sugg’s class. This year we made it a class goal to serve in at least 3 different kindness projects this year. After watching videos and reading books on how to spread kindness, we brainstormed ways to show kindness in our community. Who deserves appreciation? What should we do for them? How can we make this happen? This is how The Donut Kindness Project got started!

After the class decision to begin spreading kindness to the community with donuts, Miss Sugg’s students got to work!

Dac9kg1VwAAPFJ0Students created a list of tasks that would need to be accomplished, and each student chose a job according to their interests and passion.  Students wrote persuasive letters to the principals (to seek permission for the project!), made parent invitations, contacted donut shops, and researched where, who and how they would serve.

DZARBoQXkAACaeM (1)With jobs completed and a plan in place, the class was ready to invite the principals into the classroom to share the project plan and ask for permission to make it happen! Students delivered letters to Square Donuts and Taylor’s Bakery (both within walking distance of the school) to ask for their partnership.

IMG_1822With the “Go-ahead” from our principals and help from the local bakeries, were off to our Kindness Walk! Our first stop was at Square Donuts to pick up our 4 boxes of donated donuts! During our walk we donated a box to the Fishers Police Department, the Fishers Fire Department, the Fishers Public Library, and to local construction workers! We ended our walk with a pit stop at Taylor’s Bakery to celebrate our hard work and success with some donut holes for our own!

Celebration Houses 1 – Connected Learning

IMG_8995This two-part story is a wonderful example of how great teachers foster deep and meaningful learning. As you read about the Celebration Houses project, notice how Indiana’s Academic Standards are addressed in ways that are inquiry-based, engaging, and authentic. Notice how student teams collaborate towards a final creative product. One more…Notice how technology was employed purposefully as a cognitive learning tool!

HSE21 Shorts asked fifth grade teachers Amber Hudson and Lisa Keaffaber, from Hamilton Southeastern Intermediate & Junior High, to take us into their ‘teacher brains’ to explain how this learning experience connected content from across the curriculum. In our next post, we’ll examine ways in which this project fostered community connections both within the classroom and throughout our city.

Q: How did this project come about?

A: It all started when Amber said, “Hey, I heard about this gingerbread house idea, and I think we should try it.”  After brainstorming some ideas on how to incorporate it into our curriculum, standards, and our students’ interests, the Gingerbread Celebration House Project was born.

Students returned from Thanksgiving break to find the classrooms transformed. In place of desks were heaps of cardboard and cardboard boxes. Hanging around the rooms were 31 QR codes with pictures, and huge sheets of paper with thought-provoking questions.

Before students could experience the room, we read two picture books: one on being an American and one on faith.  Both books focused on the beautiful differences that are among us and seen in our celebrations of faith.  After experiencing the songs, dances, videos, and pictures of the various holidays via the QR codes and pictures, each student uploaded a video to FlipGrid explaining which celebrations they found most interesting. This is how we determined which student would construct which house.

IMG_9008Q: What were your goals for the project?

A: Our goals were to give students an awareness and appreciation of cultural celebrations from around the world that occur throughout the year AND to have them share their understanding with the people of Fishers.

Though many families in our district do celebrate Christmas, other important holidays are celebrated by families in our classroom and around the world that are also significant and special.

Q: How did the learning experience align with academic standards? 

In humanities class, social studies is incorporated into reading and writing. Through reading, students discovered both similarities and differences they had with other students’ traditions.  For example, light (as in candles and strands of lights) are a common feature in holidays for Buddhists, Christians, Jews, and Muslims.

Here is a sample of Indiana Academic Standards for humanities subjects that were addressed in this project:

Reading standards

  • Determine two or more main ideas of a text.
  • Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more events, ideas, or concepts based on specific information in the text.
  • Combine information from several texts or digital sources on the same topic in order to demonstrate knowledge about the subject.
  • Determine the meaning of general academic and content-specific words and phrases in a nonfiction text relevant to a fifth grade topic or text.

Writing standards:

  •  Introduce a topic; organize sentences and paragraphs logically, using an organizational form that suits the topic.
  • Employ sufficient examples, facts, quotations, or other information from various sources and texts to give clear support for topics.
  • Connect ideas within and across categories using transition words (e.g., therefore, in addition).
  • Include text features (e.g., formatting, pictures, graphics) and multimedia when useful to aid comprehension.

In STEM (Science-Technology-Engineering-Math) class, math and science are interwoven for a more real world experience. Constructing and decorating the Celebration Houses became an authentic means through which students could practice STEM skills. Students used the engineering design process to develop a viable structure for their house; they then applied their skills to construct and decorate their houses.  Hands on.  The engagement was through the roof — literally!

Math standards:

  • Multiply multi-digit whole numbers fluently using a standard algorithmic approach.
  • Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals to hundredths, using models or drawings and strategies based on place value or the properties of operations.  Describe the strategy and explain the reasoning.
  • Solve real-world problems involving multiplication and division of whole numbers and decimals
  • Find the area of a rectangle with fractional side lengths by modeling with unit squares of the appropriate unit fraction side lengths, and show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths.  Multiply fractional side lengths to find areas of rectangles, and represent fraction products as rectangular areas.

Enjoy the Celebration House photos below, and be on the lookout for Celebration Houses 2, as the Celebration Houses head out to the Fishers community!

 

Investigation, Collaboration, and Chinese Dance…GES Does It All!

Thank you to Media Specialist Kelly Pidcock for sharing a few of the engaging and varied learning experiences happening at Geist Elementary this fall!

geist 3Have you ever wondered what makes a glow stick glow?  Erica Erickson’s 4th graders used that question as a springboard for an investigative process practicing the scientific method. First, students hypothesized and gathered materials. Following an intriguing demonstration by Mrs. Erickson, students wrote the steps to the procedure, formed observations, and drew conclusions. Through the experiment, students discovered that glow sticks have two chemicals.  In the large plastic tube is the diphenyl oxalate.  The plastic tube also contains a smaller glass tube which holds hydrogen peroixide and chemiluminescent dye.  When a glow stick is cracked, the shattering of the glass tube allows the chemicals to combine and form a reaction.  Now that’s a GLOWING experiment! #buddingscientists

Geist Elementary is very fortunate to be one of three pilot schools for Global Studies at HSE.  In this first rotation, children experienced Chinese language through educator Sandra Cao-Wilson’s instruction in Mandarin. Music educator Jen Koenig teamed with Cao-Wilson to provide tastes of Chinese customs and music.  Students sang “Happy Birthday” in Mandarin and learned about birthday celebrations in China.  The students also also had the opportunity to try out traditional Chinese instruments and dance —  students learned the Little Apple Dance and the Fan Dance.

geist1

Designing with the Educreations app — using a sound shield to improve audio results

In a fun example of student-centered learning, Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Scott recently let their 4th graders drive instruction. The goal: to build visual and multimedia tools to showcase some strategies for solving multiplication problems. Students teams agreed upon a presentation mode then got to work creating.

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The “repeated addition” group using props to create a video

Collaboration and peer review helped the students to produce stellar learning tools to share. The final creations were posted on Canvas to reach a wider audience of parents and families. Now, classroom volunteers have some tools with which to assist during math block!

Encouraging Leaders Through Literature

Amazing how a simple conversation between educators can spark a cross-curricular, global, enduring learning experience.  Thanks to Mrs. Kussy & Mrs. Robinson (3rd grade) from Brooks School Elementary for writing up this incredible HSE21 project to share with us, to Mrs. Patrick (BSE Media Specialist) for the video story, and to the many third graders who, through Wikispaces, are teaching the rest of us about some wonderful, insightful books!

It started as a simple collaboration between us and Mrs. Patrick and with a goal: get powerful diverse books into the hands of third graders and effectively use them to help students learn to identify a theme and support it with explicit text evidence. The books the students are reading are in the BSE Library’s collection of diverse literature which was purchased through the “Windows and Mirrors” grant — an HSE Foundation Grant that Mrs. Patrick received in 2015.

We began with three simple goals for our students. First, read and enjoy books with diversity. Second, identify the theme and support it with evidence. Third, share it beyond our classroom walls. Of course, Mrs. Patrick had a brilliant suggestion to create a class Wikispace website as the avenue to share these beautiful books and the student’s thinking and writing. Each class created its own Wiki to do just that. Students are united together in one space sharing their thoughts globally while reading diverse global texts. Students began the year sharing responses and reflections in a personal space, notebooks. Then they moved to sharing reflections via a classroom space, Seesaw. So a natural progression was to move to a global space for sharing, a Wikispace.

Weekly, students are self-selecting diverse books of interest to read and share their thinking. As they do this, they are able to add to other classmate’s posts to support their thinking with more evidence. Our next step is to have digital discussions about their affirmation or opposition to the same pieces of literature.

Throughout this entire process students have had to opportunity to discover that they are connected in some fashion with leaders of the past or present, and realistic fictional characters. Naturally, this had led us as teachers to discuss global issues being addressed through the United Nations Global Goals for Sustainable Development. Along the way students are discovering leaders, real and fictional, representing cultures and diversity from all around the world and are in turn identifying these places on the world map. As we step back and analyze the work the students are involved in, it is addressing every content area and more. All of this work is “Encouraging Leaders Through Literature”.

Learn about many diverse books on our class Wikispaces!  

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http://mrskussysclass.wikispaces.com/

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http://mrsrobinsonsclassbse.wikispaces.com/

March 2nd, aka…?

Dr. Seuss’ birthday, of course! At Harrison Parkway Elementary, the birthday of the beloved rhyming genius and children’s author is celebrated yearly in a big way. At HPE, March 2nd is Seussical Day! As part of her commitment to Read Across America, HPE Media Specialist Kristin Sager rolls out the red carpet every March 2nd, inviting family and community readers to come share a Seuss title. First and second grade students rotate through a half day of Seussical experiences, all designed to encourage the love of literature and reading.

Enjoy the slide show below of this year’s Seussical Day! (If reading via email distribution, click on post title to view slide show.)

 

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